Brief History of MAI

July 1, 1831

On July 1, 1831 in Walachia and January 1, 1832 in Moldavia, respectively, when the Organic Act came into force, the naming of Ministry of Domestic Affairs was used for the first time. The institution will be known later on as the Ministry of the Interior, and it used to deal with the management of the general administration of the country, public order and state safety, as well as the coordination of certain important sectors of social and economic activity.

July 20, 1862

Decree No. 495, signed by Alexandru Ioan Cuza, dissolves the Directorate of Ministry of the Interior from Iasi and unites the departments from Wallachia and Moldavia. Starting this moment, there will be only one Ministry of The Interior, having its headquarters in Bucharest.

July 20, 1864

On the basis of Law No.160, the Ministry of the Interior and the Ministry of Public Works merged and the new institution got the name of Ministry of the Interior, Agriculture and Public Works. The law mentioned above was necessary in order to improve public works, by having the support of the general administration. Four years later, in 1868, the Ministry of Agriculture, Commerce and Public Works replaced the Ministry of the Interior

November 1, 1892

 Once “The Law regarding the organizing of the exterior administrative authorities, which are dependent on the Ministry of the Interior, and the establishing of the administrative districts” was approved, the territorial units of the Ministry of the Interior were also organized. Therefore, the Ministry of the Interior consisted of: general administrative inspectorates, county prefect’s offices, county sub-prefect’s offices, small rural districts (called “plasi”), urban and rural mayor’s offices.

June 20, 1913

 A new law was adopted, regarding the structure of the Ministry of the Interior. Therefore, the ministry consisted of central and special services. Among other special services, there were the General Directorate of Sanitary Service, the General Directorate of Telegraphs, Mail and Telephones, the General Directorate of Prisons, the Official Gazette, and the State Publishing House.

June 22, 1919

By means of a Decree-Law, the structure of the Ministry of the Interior extended to the level of the whole Great Romania.

July 21, 1929

The Administrative Law was adopted by the Deputies’ Assembly and by the Senate on the 25th of July. The Prefect, as the head of the county administration, was the representative of the government in the county, being appointed on the basis of a Royal Decree.

August 2, 1929

“The Ministries’ Law” was adopted, which also regulated the activity of the Ministry of the Interior. The tasks of this institution referred to leading the country’s general administration, ensuring the state order and safety, local administration control etc.

January 25, 1930

By "The Organizational Regulation of the Ministry of the Interior” brought back the definition of the Ministry of the Interior given by the Organic Law almost a century before, stipulating that “It is the Ministry’s of the Interior mission to ensure the general administration of the country and the state order and safety”.

January 4, 1936

"The Law regarding the organizing of the Ministry of the Interior” specified that the institution, as a political factor in charge of the domestic order of the state, had a double mission: ensuring the general administration of the country and safeguarding public order and state safety. Beside the Ministry of the Interior, there were functioning, as attached institutions, the National Office of Tourism, the National Office of Defense against Air Attacks, the Office of Radio Broadcasting and Cinema, and the General Institute of Statistics;

September 28, 1939

The Ministry of Public Order was created, which was in charge of ensuring the management of the State General Police and of the Gendarmerie. This ministry was dissolved on the 3rd of October 1939, its competencies being taken over by the Ministry of the Interior.

1941

Ministry of the Interior changed its name into the Ministry of Home Affairs.

1947

A new structure of the Ministry of Home Affairs was approved, and several services of the central and local administration were included in it. The Border Guards, created in 1904, were taken over by the Ministry of the Interior and stayed there till 1960, when they were transferred to the Ministry of National Defense. After the events from 1989, they went back to the Ministry of the Interior;

August 30, 1948

The Decree No. 221 stipulated that the General Directorate of the People’s Security became part of the Ministry of Home Affairs.

March 16, 1949

By Decree No.102, the Ministry of Home Affairs was once again reorganised, from that moment on the institution was headed by a minister with the support of a council, deputy ministers and ministerial advisers.

September 20, 1952

Decree No. 324 reorganized the Ministry of Domestic Affairs. Therefore, the Ministry of State Security was created, as a central distinct structure of the Ministry of Home Affairs.

September 7, 1953

Decree No. 365 stipulated the unification of the Ministry of State Security and the Ministry of Home Affairs. On the 11th of July 1956, the Ministers’ Council Decision No. 1361 establishes a new organisation chart of the Ministry of Home Affairs, which consisted of two departments: the Security Department and the Department of the Interior.

May 30, 1963

The Ministry of Home Affairs got a new organizational structure, by means of Decree No. 141: the Security Department, the Political Directorate of Troops and Formations of the Ministry of Home Affairs, the Troops, the Military, the General Directorate of the State Archives, territorial units (16 regional units).

July 22, 1967

The Ministry of Home Affairs got a new organizational structure, by means of Decree No. 710. The ministry use to include the Department of State Security, which was led by the Council of State Security.

April 4, 1968

The Ministry of Home Affairs was reorganized again and the Council of State Security became a separate central state institution.

April 19, 1972

By means of Decree No. 130, the Council of State Security merged with the Ministry of Domestic Affairs. The following structures were also part of the new institution: the Security, the Militia, the Troops of Security and Firefighters, the Penitentiaries, and the State Archives.

December 22, 1989

In accordance with the Decision of the National Salvation Front, the Ministry of the Interior was subordinate to the Superior Military Council.

December 25, 1989

In accordance with the Statement no. 2 of the National Salvation Front, all units of the Ministry of The Interior were subordinated to the Ministry of National Defense.

December 18, 1990

By Law No. 40 regarding the organizing and functioning of the Ministry of the Interior, the institution consists of the following structures: Police, Gendarmerie, Border Police, Firefighters and National Archives.

June 3, 1992

Law No. 56 stipulates that the Border Guard Troops Command becomes the National Border Guard Command, being taken over by the Ministry of the Interior from the Ministry of National Defense;

June 4, 1999

The Romanian Government Emergency Ordinance No. 80 sets up the Romanian Border Police, reuniting the National Border Guard Command, the Directorate of Border Police and the Naval Transport Police from the General Inspectorate of Romanian Police;

June 28, 2003

By the Romanian Government Emergency Ordinance No. 63, approved by the Law No. 604 of December 22, 2003, the Ministry of the Interior merged with the Ministry of Public Administration, getting the name of Ministry of Administration and Interior

December 22, 2012

By the GEO No. 96/ 2012 the Ministry of Administration and Interior became the Ministry of Internal Affairs was set up, after the Ministry of Administration and Interior was reorganised, the activity related to the public administration area being taken over by the Ministry of Regional Development and Public Administration.